Poster Design Connection from 1917 to 2017

This semester I have been enrolled in Art and Design History through the art school. Each week we have to do a discussion post and this weeks caught my attention more so than others, because of the interesting connection from an art piece in 1917 to 2017.

We were given a task to answer a question about one of the pieces of artwork our professor put in a display case in the Duderstadt Center. The one I chose was called “Food —don’t waste it” (2017), by Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. Although I was struck that the artist is based in Detroit, it was his design in reference to one from the first World War that caught my attention the most.

 

2017

 

Kennedy brought up the conversation of food conservation with his design but also how it relates to this same topic during WWI. In the early 1900s, America was trying to lower food consumption in order to feed their troops. They needed to conserve to help the people who were fighting for them. I find it interesting that in 2019 although we are producing food faster and more abundantly, we still are hearing these same conservation slogans about our food habits. In recent years, food conservation is also needed but in a completely different way. We are getting our food from mass produced businesses and this is causing harm to our environment. Although many are unaware of the damage we are creating, Kennedy creates discussion about it through simple slogans and advice for sustainable options.

 

1917

image taken from https://www.nal.usda.gov/exhibits/speccoll/exhibits/show/poster-collections/item/224 

 

This poster interested me with its color, text, simplicity, and message. I recently have started eating by a plant based diet (mainly for environmental concerns) and this poster connected with me because of my new beliefs. I believe art starts conversations about topics that are hidden and I think Kennedy is doing this because food conservation is being pushed aside by the people in our government. Kennedy uses memorable slogans and simple designs to create outreach just like the artists did in the early 1900s and to see more of his amazing prints go to http://www.kennedyprints.com/ YOU WON’T REGRET IT!

Goodnight (if you are still up) and have a wonderful week:)

druzzi

freshman studying Art & Design hoping to create conversation about the arts and other weird stuuuuff

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