REVIEW: In The Heights

America is the land of opportunity. Many people from many countries immigrated to the United States in search of a better life, of a better future for their kids. And as this new generation grows up in the land they call home, they must grapple with what home truly means.

MUSKET’s performance of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s baby, the predecessor to Hamilton, embraced this culture that seems lost in the face of white America. With an extremely diverse, and truly phenomenal, cast, you could see in everyone’s eyes that they were proud and thankful for their heritage as they sang and danced their hearts out onstage at this sold out show. With flags proudly waved and memories preciously cherished, this production of In The Heights was filled with overwhelming talent and pride.

It touches on the sacrifices that parents make for the sake of the children they love and wish to provide for. The selfless hardships they endured are appreciated, not lost, on the continuing road of struggles as we all try to reach a higher pinnacle of greatness and hope. Kevin’s desire to escape the life of farming led him to leave his father’s footsteps and to pave the perfect path for Nina that he always envisioned, despite the difficulties that proves to be.

It touches on the struggles of Latinx minorities to succeed as first-generation college students. The pressure for Nina to make it out and make something of herself, and the reality of how difficult that is with financial burdens, is something that universities must take into account as they provide more assistance for more opportunities for better education.

It touches on the importance of family and community. Abuela Claudia’s presence and legacy roots Usnavi in Washington Heights and the Dominican Republic simultaneously. Benny may not be Latino, but he is among family in the Heights as well.

It touches on the dreams of leaving only to be pulled back by the weight of home.

It touches on a Latino community with no power — singing repeatedly “We are powerless” in the midst of a blackout — still powering through such adversity.

MUSKET brings all these aspects of life to the surface through powerful vocals and classic Miranda lyrics and savvy Salsa moves that exposed these struggles and difficulties — and the strength and perseverance of immigrant families.

I left the Power Center speechless, pretending I didn’t just cry after basically every number. I witnessed some of the best choreography I’ve ever seen and heard some of the best music I’ve ever laid ears on. The band’s power just enhanced the vocals and power displayed onstage, providing an amazing backdrop that set the tone for every note sung and fit with every move made. There was excitement in the air and celebratory joy and stunning sadness. It was real.

This musical forced me into a position of intense self-reflection. It made me appreciate my parents — immigrants from Taiwan — even more, and it’s given me a lot to think about in terms of my own story and my privilege and the life I’m going to make for myself here at Michigan.

However, it also brought my attention to the greater world around me, and the journey of everyone here. The diversity represented onstage was truly groundbreaking, and having such an inclusive show at the University of Michigan right now is so important. The chemistry among the cast is only natural as they share a common piece of history and understanding. The uniting factor for everyone on the cast, crew, and band was a pride in the past and a vision for the future, and that power and passion made this performance resonate beyond the stage and into the real world.

Tl; dr: The vocals: WOW. The choreography: WOOWWWW. The passion: WOWOWOW. And the message? Just *wow*.

 

Angela Lin

Angela is a sophomore studying English and the Environment. The only thing she loves more than writing and the arts are wombats.

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